About Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), (Bunyaviridae: Tospovirus) is a plant virus vectored by at least 9 species of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

Two species in particular, Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, and tobacco thrips, F. fusca, are common vectors in multiple crop systems in the southeastern United States.

Severe yield losses associated with TSWV have been reported in peanut, tobacco, tomato, pepper and potato as well as in some ornamental crops.


LATEST AG NEWS

The 2020 Southeastern Hay Contest grand prize was awarded to Brian Johnson of McKenney, Virginia, for his alfalfa hay sample (not pictured). Pictured from left to right are Ash Alt, Massey Ferguson Field Execution Manager; Lisa Baxter, UGA Forage Extension Specialist; Leanne Dillard, Auburn University Forage Extension Specialist; and Marcelo Wallau, UF Forage Extension Specialist. CAES News
The 2020 Southeastern Hay Contest grand prize was awarded to Brian Johnson of McKenney, Virginia, for his alfalfa hay sample (not pictured). Pictured from left to right are Ash Alt, Massey Ferguson Field Execution Manager; Lisa Baxter, UGA Forage Extension Specialist; Leanne Dillard, Auburn University Forage Extension Specialist; and Marcelo Wallau, UF Forage Extension Specialist.
2020 Southeastern Hay Contest winners announced
Despite the challenges of the pandemic, 370 entries were submitted in the 2020 Southeastern Hay Contest (SEHC), just below the record-setting number of submissions for 2019. More states submitted samples to the contest than ever before, with nine represented.
Georgia 4-H offers digital environmental education series CAES News
Georgia 4-H offers digital environmental education series
Georgia 4-H continues diverse online programming
This past year has presented Georgia 4-H with the opportunity to create new and innovative programming options to meet the challenges of virtual school options and social distancing required by the COVID-19 crisis. Because these circumstances have precluded students from attending traditional environmental education programming at Georgia 4-H centers and 4-H club meetings at local University of Georgia Coooperative Extension offices, teachers and parents have needed entertaining and educational online resources to keep youth engaged in non-traditional learning environments. In response, Georgia 4-H launched “From The Mountains To The Sea,” “Zoom into Science” and “Blast Off with Georgia 4-H” to allow the state’s youth to continue their participation in 4-H programming remotely.
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas.
UGA citrus trials support growing industry in Georgia
Ongoing citrus rootstock trials being conducted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Lowndes County hold promise for increased yields, improved fruit quality and greater disease resistance.