About Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), (Bunyaviridae: Tospovirus) is a plant virus vectored by at least 9 species of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

Two species in particular, Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, and tobacco thrips, F. fusca, are common vectors in multiple crop systems in the southeastern United States.

Severe yield losses associated with TSWV have been reported in peanut, tobacco, tomato, pepper and potato as well as in some ornamental crops.


LATEST AG NEWS

blueberries CAES News
Georgia agricultural innovation center to bring farmers from fresh to value-added markets
The University of Georgia is launching the Value-Addition Institute for Business Expansion, or VIBE, a new center for rural food business assistance and resources headed by professors from the Department of Food Science and Technology in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Department of Nutritional Sciences in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. VIBE is funded by a $1.5 million grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture Innovation Center.
2024 EBroadusBrowne ResearchAwards CAES News
Four graduate-level scientists receive prestigious E. Broadus Browne Research Awards
Two doctoral students and two master’s students in the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences were honored with awards for outstanding research after placing in the 2024 E. Broadus Browne Research Competition. In recognition of former Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station Director Edmund Broadus Browne, the annual competition highlights some of the best graduate research from departments within the college and challenges contestants with an oral presentation.  
PeriodicalCicada BroodXIX 2011 CAES News
Georgia's Brood XIX is here: Periodical cicadas make their mark on the Southeast
There is no doubt about it: the periodical cicadas have arrived. “Brood XIX (Brood 19) is Georgia’s only 13-year cicada. The Great Southern Brood is the largest periodical cicada brood in North America, covering at least a dozen states in the Southeast,” said Nancy Hinkle, professor in the University of Georgia Department of Entomology. “This year, millions of periodical cicadas are emerging in Georgia from now until Memorial Day.”