About Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), (Bunyaviridae: Tospovirus) is a plant virus vectored by at least 9 species of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

Two species in particular, Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, and tobacco thrips, F. fusca, are common vectors in multiple crop systems in the southeastern United States.

Severe yield losses associated with TSWV have been reported in peanut, tobacco, tomato, pepper and potato as well as in some ornamental crops.


LATEST AG NEWS

CAES’ new Poultry Science Building will give researchers and students a high-tech new roost. CAES News
Poultry Science Building to give researchers, students a high-tech new roost
In 1958, a carpenter named LC Powers built himself and his wife, Ruby Nell, a broiler house on their family’s land in northeast Georgia. The chicken house could hold 10,000 chicks, but there was barely enough electricity to power a few light bulbs in the open-sided building. The Powers’ great-granddaughter, Kylie Bruce, recounted her great-grandparents’ story at the groundbreaking for a new, technologically advanced Poultry Science Building.
The Fruit + Vegetable 40 Under 40, recognizing the fruit + vegetable industry's next generation of leaders. CAES News
UGA Extension specialist, agents honored with industry 40 under 40 awards
Four experts at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension have been recognized as members of the Fruit and Vegetable 40 under 40 Class of 2022. The list honors 40 early-career agricultural professionals for exemplary accomplishments, representing “the best in the industry.”
On Aug. 23, 2019, students at Colham Ferry Elementary School participated in the state's first-ever pollinator census. On Dec. 1, the Great Georgia Pollinator Census will become the Great Southeast Pollinator Census, expanding to include both South Carolina and North Carolina in the citizen science research project. CAES News
Great Pollinator Census expands to include neighboring states
Widening interest in efforts to support pollinators has led to a name change for the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, which will become the Great Southeast Pollinator Census on Dec. 1. The census began as a statewide community science initiative in Georgia in August 2019, created and coordinated by Becky Griffin, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension community and school garden coordinator.