About Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), (Bunyaviridae: Tospovirus) is a plant virus vectored by at least 9 species of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

Two species in particular, Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, and tobacco thrips, F. fusca, are common vectors in multiple crop systems in the southeastern United States.

Severe yield losses associated with TSWV have been reported in peanut, tobacco, tomato, pepper and potato as well as in some ornamental crops.


LATEST AG NEWS

Often planted to create borders or buffers, Leyland cypress trees can grow four feet taller in just a year. Planting too close together or too close to structures can present a huge problem as the tree matures. CAES News
Leyland cypress trees often planted incorrectly
Leyland cypress are one of the most commonly planted landscape trees, but poor site selection and disease pressure may soon send them the way of red tips and Bradford pears.
Harris story CAES News
Georgia 4-H’er selected as runner-up for National 4-H award
National 4-H Council has announced that CJ Harris of Covington, Georgia, is a runner-up for the 2022 4-H Youth in Action Award for STEM. Harris is recognized nationally for his work to use 3D printing to effectively and cheaply produce prosthetic limbs for children.
CAES Dean Nick Place and Associate Dean Joe Broder with CAES Congressional Agricultural Fellows CAES News
Congressional Agricultural Fellowship creating generations of leaders
For more than 20 years, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) has encouraged students to explore an important, yet often overlooked, side of Georgia’s leading industry. Since its creation in 1997, the Congressional Agricultural Fellowship has offered 123 students a firsthand look into the world of agricultural policy by placing them in legislative offices located in our nation’s capital. Each summer, a handful of CAES students move to Delta Hall in Washington, D.C., to represent the college and serve as agricultural liaisons in Georgia’s congressional offices.